Features

Local teacher joins colleagues in massive grading session

Mary DeLaney, a teacher at Huntington North High School, graded more than 800 essays from the Advanced Placement English Literature and Composition Exam for a week in June at the Kentucky International Convention Center in Louisville, KY.
Photo by Matt Murphy.

Originally published July 2, 2009.

Each year, hundreds of thousands of high school students around the country and around the word take what are known as "Advanced Placement" exams.

These exams are usually the culmination of year-long high school courses, and students are eligible to receive college credit for passing the exams, depending on the grade received.

Every exam, except for a small number of art and language courses, consists of a multiple-choice section and a free-response or essay section.

Woodstock lives on in one man's heart -- and basement

Richard Williams stands in front of the peace sign etched in his back yard to the 1969 music festival Woodstock. Williams guesses the sign reaches between 60 and 70 feet across. His original peace sign was created in 2007 for the “Summer of Love."
Photo by Jessica Williams.

Originally published June 25, 2009.

As society moves forward, Richard Williams of rural Huntington wants to make sure people don't forget to look back.

Williams grew up in the '60s, and he knows just about everything about the era to prove it.

He has a library of more 200 books on the generation and tons of DVDs and videotapes. But what's most impressive is his love for Woodstock and all the keepsakes he owns from the monumental event that have piled up his basement.

Herz bares his soles for the run

Michael Herz completed his first barefoot half-marathon recently in Illinois. Shown with Herz is a pair of Nike Free running shoes, which he says are the closest thing to running barefoot with actually going bare.
Photo by Jessica Williams.

One Huntington resident knows his feet better than the back of his hand, as the saying goes. That's because he runs mile after mile barefoot.

Dr. Michael Herz just received his anger management therapist license in May. He hopes to open an office in town. He has lived in Huntington since 1988, moving here from Chicago.

He's been training barefoot for three years after he heard about barefoot running on the Internet.

Herz has even discussed this with his physicians and, he says, "they have no problem with it."

Curiosity may be bad for the cat, but not for the brain

Huntington resident David Beaty works on his computer at the Huntington City-Township Library. The library is launching a program geared toward helping seniors increase their brain power through a variety of activities and creative experiences.
Photo by Andre B. Laird.

Originally published June 15.

It was once believed that as a person gets older, he or she loses brain power and is unable to retain as much information as before.

Kathy Holst, director of the Huntington City-Township Library, says recent research has shown that to be false.

"A lot of earlier research was usually done on diseased brains," Holst states. "However, with the advancement of technology, we are now able to study healthy, functioning brains, which has resulted in a lot of new findings."

School may be out, but these teachers are still learning

First grade teachers from Northwest Elementary (from left) Ronda Hawkins, Stacie Hines and Nancy Peace listen as first grade teacher from Andrews Elementary, Jo Keller (right), talks in a small group activity during Model Teaching Week at Horace Mann Elem
Photo by Jessica Williams.

Originally published June 11, 2009.

This week is Model Teaching Week for Huntington County Schools.

Elementary, middle and Huntington North teachers have volunteered a week of their summer vacations to attend the series of trainings, held at Horace Mann Elementary for elementary school teachers and Riverview Middle School for middle school and high school teachers.

The purpose of the session, called Highly Effective Teaching, is to learn better methods of effective teaching.

Kindergartners put new reading skills to good use

Lancaster Elementary School teacher Jeanne Paff coaches student Nicholas Johnson as he records a story for students at the kindergarten class’s sister school in Zhuhai City, China. The books and a CD of the students reading the stories will both be sent t
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published June 1, 2009.

The kindergartners at Lancaster Elementary School are learning how to read English.

Their counterparts in Zhuhai City, China, are learning to speak English.

Through connections forged by a Huntington University professor, the two schools on opposite sides of the world have created a link that will help both classes achieve their goals - and the rural Huntington County students, at least, are learning how much they have in common with the Chinese children.

Miss Huntington heads to Zionsville

Miss Huntington Mallory Bunting.
Photo by Matt Murphy.

Huntington's own Mallory Bunting will have a shot at becoming Miss Indiana next week at the Zionsville Performing Arts Center in Zionsville.

Bunting was named Miss Huntington last October, beating 11 other contestants to win the crown.

Now, she's gearing up for the statewide pageant, to be held June 21 through June 27.

"I'm nervous. I've never done the state pageant before," says Bunting.

Bunting cites the high-profile nature of the event, constantly being on the spot and older, more experienced competitors as reasons for her anxiousness.

Student composer finds the roar of the crowd a sweet tune

HNHS senior Adam Riecke (right) poses with the score of his composition, "Red of Roses," and HNHS band director Thaine Campbell, who directed the school's Symphonic Band in a performance of Riecke's piece.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published May 28, 2009.

Adam Riecke is pretty well-rounded, musically.

He sings and dances, he plays a half-dozen instruments. And he writes music.

Not rap, not rock, not gospel.

Riecke, a high school senior, is composing for an orchestra.

"I like all genres of music," he says. "But I think the sound of an orchestra playing is relaxing."

A dream (almost) come true

Kent Schenkel with the state-of-the-art helmet he uses. Schenkel will participate in an ARCA test run May 27, with an opportunity to race on June 12.
Photo by Matt Murphy

Originally published May 25, 2009

Kent Schenkel has been chasing a lifelong dream for almost a decade.

Literally chasing. And passing. And tuning up.

Schenkel, 58, of Huntington, will be at the Michigan International Speedway in Brooklyn, Mich., on May 27, testing for a chance to qualify in the Automobile Racing Club of America's (ARCA) RE/MAX Series "Racing for Wildlife 200" on June 12.

"It's been a dream that's coming true," he said.

A passion for pooches sends young trio into fund-raising business

Kylie Frederick, Stephanie McElhaney and Chloe Spencer (from left) display the three dog portraits they donated to the Huntington County Humane Society, along with more than $300 earmarked for a new humane shelter. The girls raised the money through a rum
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

A duo determined to help lost and abandoned animals has expanded to become a trio, holding fast to their dream of helping to build a new shelter for the homeless pets.

"We love animals so much," says Chloe Spencer.
Spencer and friend Kylie Frederick were recognized last year by the Huntington County Humane Society for their longstanding efforts to help improve the humane shelter.

And they're still at it.

Local Elk says year at the top has given him a wealth of experiences

Don Schoeff is state president of the Indiana Elks Association. Schoeff says the post has afforded him the opportunity to visit many other chapters.
Photo by Andre B. Laird.

Originally published May 14, 2009.

Don Schoeff says the past year has been one filled with many miles on the road and many friendships made.

Schoeff is the president of the Indiana Elks Association, a one-year term that has seen him make numerous visits to other Elk chapters.

"I have been a member of the Elks for 45 years," Schoeff states. "The journey to becoming an Elk president is not a short one."

Schoeff says that in order to qualify to be an Elk president, there are a number of stages that a potential member has to complete.

A leap, and then a splash -- and another trophy under his paws

Brian Johnson and his dog Gunner, along with Johnson's daughter Krista, display some of the awards Gunner has won while competing in dock jumping competitions around the Midwest.
Photo contributed.

Originally published May 11, 2009.

It's a family affair, but it's the family dog that is basking in the spotlight.

Brian Johnson and his dog Gunner got involved in dock jumping last year and enjoyed it so much, they plan to go to even more competitions this year. Since the whole family generally goes along, the Johnsons consider the events "mini vacations," Brian says.

Women knit friendships as they warm their corner of the world

Linda Lakes, Cindy Shideler, Kathy Harrell, Beth Fulton, Sandy Diffenbaugh, Dortha Beachy and Sally Schenkel (from left) are members of The Loose Ends, a knitting and crocheting group.
Photo by Andre Laird.

Originally published May 7, 2009

For many people, crocheting and knitting offer a form of therapy and allows them to create pieces of art.

One local group of women has taken its love for the art form and used it to help others.

Beth Fulton heads up The Loose Ends, a group comprised of area women who love to crochet and knit.

"We started last October," states Fulton. "I was asked by a friend to start up a group that could get together."

World War II veteran left Huntington a legacy of service

Ted Rogers (left), who organized the Huntington-based unit of the Army National Guard, talks with the company’s most recent commander, Command Sgt. Maj. Jeffrey Duncan, during a welcome home party Saturday, April 25, for Delta Company.
Photo by Cindy Klepper.

Originally published April 30, 2009.

Ted Rogers seems almost offended when asked why, after spending four years serving his country during World War II, he agreed to take on the responsibility of establishing an Army National Guard armory in Huntington.

"To protect our country," he says, after a pause. He had the training and the know-how, he adds. "I wanted to pass that on to another generation."

Andrews lays claims to its famous Clark twins

Shown with one of the signs the Andrews Lions Club had made to recognize the accomplishments of the Clark twins are (from left) Lion Phil Bitzer, Joe Clark, Dale Clark, Lions President Joyce Walker and Lion Phil Ruppert.
Photo by Scott Trauner.

Originally published April 27, 2009.

Members of the Andrews Lions Club recently recognized the accomplishments of the famous Clark Twins, who hailed from the small burg in western Huntington County, by having signs made to place on the north and south ends of town in their honor.

The signs, which read "Hometown of the Clark Twins," will be placed along Ind.-105 - near the Andrews-Dallas Township Fire station on the north edge of town and just before the curve on the south edge of town.

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