New 127-acre industrial site to be called Riverfork Industrial Park West

City officials join Huntington County United Economic Development representatives as they announce the name of Riverfork Industrial Park West for the newly acquired, 127-acre industrial site on the southwest side of Huntington. Pictured (from left) are Dale Buuck, marketing consultant; Huntington Common Council President Charles Chapman; Common Councilman Joe Blomeke; and HCUED Executive Director Mark Wickersham. The site is located alongside CR200N, west of Ind.-9.
City officials join Huntington County United Economic Development representatives as they announce the name of Riverfork Industrial Park West for the newly acquired, 127-acre industrial site on the southwest side of Huntington. Pictured (from left) are Dale Buuck, marketing consultant; Huntington Common Council President Charles Chapman; Common Councilman Joe Blomeke; and HCUED Executive Director Mark Wickersham. The site is located alongside CR200N, west of Ind.-9. Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The board of directors for the Huntington County United Economic Development Corporation (HCUED) has announced the selection of the name Riverfork Industrial Park West for the newly acquired, 127-acre industrial site on the southwest side of Huntington.

“The economic development team and the leadership of the City of Huntington have for decades envisioned a new industrial park at this location and today marks a next step in its future,” said Mark Wickersham, executive director of HCUED.

According to Wickersham, acquisition of the site was completed in January 2019 with HCUED securing a mortgage from a local bank, guaranteed with a contract between the City of Huntington and HCUED, unanimously approved by the Huntington Common Council.

“The land is owned by HCUED as a non-profit, 501c3 (non-governmental) entity; however, economic development is a team sport. Land acquisition was not possible without the combined efforts of the city and HCUED, nor will the lands’ eventual development,” he said.
Development of the land will comply with all local comprehensive planning and development standards and the mortgage obligation must be fulfilled.

“If we are successful in selling the real estate for industrial use per the community’s comprehensive plan, the proceeds of the sale will pay the mortgage,” Wickersham said. “If not, or if only partially sold, or if a major employer opportunity presents itself which genuinely merits an incentive more valuable than the land itself, the contract with the city pays the mortgage.”

Huntington Common Councilman Joe Blomeke, who has been part of the Lime City Committee for decades, led early efforts to promote this location. Common Council President Charles Chapman led the council deliberations based on research from HCUED.

Efforts to secure site certification recognition from the State of Indiana will be coordinated through HCUED beginning later this spring.