They gotta go, it's gotta go and Knight makes it go

Waldo Knight, shown standing in front of his family's swine exhibit at the Huntington County 4-H Fair, is in charge of manure disposal at the fair.
Waldo Knight, shown standing in front of his family's swine exhibit at the Huntington County 4-H Fair, is in charge of manure disposal at the fair. Photo by Jessica Williams.

Originally published July 30, 2009.

Waldo Knight is no stranger to the 4-H Fair. Nor is he new to keeping the animal pens clean.

Knight is the chair of the Manure Disposal Committee for the Huntington County Fair, and has been for the past three years. His family has also been involved somehow in the fair for 44 years.

Other committee members are Jason Worster and Wade Tyner.
With all those animals on display, one might think it's a demanding job, but Knight says it's not that bad.

"The amount of manure is not that much. We have more bedding and wood chips and stuff like that than we actually have of the manure," he says.

The bedding is continually thrown away to keep the animals clean, Knight adds.

There are five spreaders 4-H participants can fill up. The animals have been on the grounds since Friday, and Knight says they haven't had to unload the waste yet.

He says in a week's time at the fair, there will probably be a maximum of six to seven trailer loads of animal waste.

"There's not the volume people think," he says.
But what is there is stacked or given to people to spread into gardens and used as compost, Knight says.

The arena shavings are stored to be used in the future as well. Most of the shavings are sent to a farm south of town, he says, and used as compost.

"We really don't have as much manure as people think. It's more bedding ... it's not too bad," he adds.

He says he got the job because he's one of the few farmers on the fair board and has access to tractors and spreaders, and he doesn't mind the job either.

"We've got to have somebody to manage it, know what to do with it and how to handle it," Knight says of the job's benefits to the fair.

This farmer of more than 50 years also encourages people to come to the fair.

"I love it. I'd rather come to the fair than take a vacation," Knight adds.