Schenkel enjoys her chance to help

Greta Schenkel (fright) looks at a book with Kids Kampus students Riley Fritcha (left) and Nate Garber (center) during her visit on Monday, Nov. 9. Schenkel won the Herbert D. LaMont Award on Saturday evening, Nov. 7, for her volunteerism at the building.
Greta Schenkel (fright) looks at a book with Kids Kampus students Riley Fritcha (left) and Nate Garber (center) during her visit on Monday, Nov. 9. Schenkel won the Herbert D. LaMont Award on Saturday evening, Nov. 7, for her volunteerism at the building. Photo by Jessica Williams.

Greta Schenkel, the Herbert D. LaMont Award winner, walked through the halls of Kids Kampus on Monday, Nov. 9, showing off her plaque she received just two days prior, which was carefully wrapped in a towel.

"I like coming here," Schenkel says of volunteering at Pathfinder Kids Kampus. She logs 20 to 30 hours a week at the daycare, mostly in the Adventurers Room, which houses young children.

She does a variety of things during her visits.

"I sit with the (kids) and play with them ..." Schenkel says.

She explains that it's fun for her and makes her happy, and that she thinks her volunteer-ism makes the kids happy too. Schenkel also says it gives her something to do.

Becky Slone, one of the leaders in the Adventurer's Room, says Schenkel also calms the kids down during naptime.

"I think she enjoys being here and helping us in this room," Slone adds.

Schenkel helps clean tables and set up items for classroom activities, such as cups and rugs.

"I go outside with them (for) some fresh air," she laughs. She explains that since she doesn't spend a lot of time daily at the building, she doesn't have time to go on field trips with them, though.

Schenkel says she comes to help out and likes to volunteer. She also says her parents, Kent and Sally Schenkel, got her involved.

She reflects on getting the award, and says many friends were there to watch her receive it.

"Everybody was there," she says.

Many people support her and her endeavor.

"I think that's really great that she got a reward. She does a lot of great things for this room and for all of the rooms around here. She does a very good job," Slone says.

Schenkel thinks her disabilities help her relate to the kids that she gets to help on a regu-lar basis.

Being a former Pathfinder student, Schenkel still stays involved with the organization by going swimming and bowling with Pathfinder clients.