July 4 a loud birthday party to preschool youth

Kids Kampus Discoverers Class teacher Karissa Ditzler (right) helps Madison Yarger, 4, stamp her handprint on the flag mural during craft time Thursday, June 30.
Kids Kampus Discoverers Class teacher Karissa Ditzler (right) helps Madison Yarger, 4, stamp her handprint on the flag mural during craft time Thursday, June 30. Photo by Rebecca Sandlin.

The 3 and 4 year olds in the Discoverers class at Kids Kampus know all about birthdays.

With three or four digits held up in the air, they can tell you on one hand how many of them they’ve celebrated. However, the kids spent the past week learning that our country has a birthday, too.

The eager pupils in teacher Karissa Ditzler’s class got their red, white and blue on, as they created crafts, lent their handprints to make the stripes on a flag painting and celebrated Independence Day with birthday cake.

“Well, I’m having a birthday when I get 4,” says Jayce Kellog, 3.

Ditzler says the concept of Independence Day is still new to the youngsters, who largely understand it on their own terms.

“We try to explain it to them, but it goes a little over their heads,” she says, during craft time at Kids Kampus Thursday, June 30. “We talked about how it’s our birthday, and tomorrow we’re having cupcakes and we’re going to sing ‘Happy Birthday.’ We did a little flannel board about it and they made flags yesterday.”

One thing the kids are looking forward to this Independence Day is fireworks. Some, like Jayce, know they can sometimes be dangerous for small fry.

“My mamaw turns off the fireworks,” he says; however, he adds he’s also been to see a fireworks display.

“I did it one time. They were red and yellow and blue and orange,” he explains. “They were really loud in my ears.”

“They’re loud!” adds Addison Bowman, 4.

“I like the music ones. It sings,” says Riley Armstrong, 3. “And we like to go to the hot air balloons.”

“I had a hot dog!” pipes up Logan Platt, 3, who expressed his fondness for Fourth of July cookouts.

Wearing their bathing suits, Ditzler’s pupils enjoyed having their hands swabbed with red (washable) paint, then applying them to paper to put the “red” in the red, white and blue. They also had a blast using fly swatters to splat red and blue paint onto clean, white paper.
“We’re doing it outside so we can hose them off afterward,” Ditzler says.