Expanded PHH rehab center to bear name of late dept. leader

Taking part in the ceremonial groundbreaking for an expanded rehabilitation and wellness center and a new wound clinic at Parkview Huntington Hospital on Friday, Nov. 17, are (from left) Tom Wall, president of the Huntington County Commissioners; Juli Johnson, president of Parkview Huntington Hospital; Sherilyn Emberton, president of Huntington University; Mark Sale, husband of the late Holly Sale, the long-time rehabilitation and wellness director for whom the new center will be named; Mike Packnett, president and CEO of Parkview Health; Jeremy Nix, Parkview Huntington Foundation board member; Dr. Todd Sider of Parkview Physicians Group – General Surgery, who will lead the wound clinic staff; Dr. Theppanya Keolasy, chief of the medical staff at Parkview Huntington Hospital; John Nelson, vice chair of the Parkview Huntington Hospital board of directors; and Huntington Mayor Brooks Fetters.
Taking part in the ceremonial groundbreaking for an expanded rehabilitation and wellness center and a new wound clinic at Parkview Huntington Hospital on Friday, Nov. 17, are (from left) Tom Wall, president of the Huntington County Commissioners; Juli Johnson, president of Parkview Huntington Hospital; Sherilyn Emberton, president of Huntington University; Mark Sale, husband of the late Holly Sale, the long-time rehabilitation and wellness director for whom the new center will be named; Mike Packnett, president and CEO of Parkview Health; Jeremy Nix, Parkview Huntington Foundation board member; Dr. Todd Sider of Parkview Physicians Group – General Surgery, who will lead the wound clinic staff; Dr. Theppanya Keolasy, chief of the medical staff at Parkview Huntington Hospital; John Nelson, vice chair of the Parkview Huntington Hospital board of directors; and Huntington Mayor Brooks Fetters.

An expanded rehabilitation and wellness center at Parkview Huntington Hospital will be named in honor of the woman who led that department until her death last June, Parkview Health administrators announced on Friday, Nov. 17.

“This remarkable woman touched countless lives,” PHH President Juli Johnson said of Holly Sale. “This project is her gifts to us … It is her legacy, the sum of her life’s work.”

Johnson and Mike Packnett, president and CEO of Parkview Health, unveiled a banner announcing the name of the expanded facility, the Holly D. Sale Rehabilitation and Wellness Center.

The addition will also include a new wound care clinic.

Bringing the expansion to fruition was in large part the work of Sale, Johnson said.

“It was a journey that — everyone has said — that Holly Sale was involved in every step of the way,” Johnson said.

Sale had been with the local hospital for 39 years, starting her career in physical therapy in 1978. She most recently served as director of rehabilitation and wellness, Physicians Specialty Clinic and service excellence/patient experience.

Just before her death, she had completed working with the architect on a design for the expansion.

The new construction will extend east from the current rehabilitation and wellness center, with work set to begin this month and be completed in early 2019. Both the expanded rehabilitation and wellness center and the wound care clinic will be housed in the same building, with a separate external entrance for the wound care clinic.

“That rehabilitation and wellness center was really bursting at the seams,” said John Nelson, vice chair of the Parkview Huntington Hospital board of directors. More staff and additional hours had been added to serve the growing numbers of patients, he said.

The expanded center will increase the number of gyms from one to four, with two specifically for pediatric patients. It will also offer additional private treatment rooms, more classroom space, a larger cardiac rehabilitation area, a renovated fitness center and a larger track, Johnson said.

The wound care clinic will draw patients from surrounding counties, Johnson said.

That clinic will also allow local patients to be treated close to home, said Dr. Theppanya Keolasy, chief of the medical staff at Parkview Huntington Hospital. Many of those patients will be treated for diabetic ulcers, he noted, considering the prevalence of diabetes in the community.

The expansion will create 13 new jobs the first year with additional jobs added later, said Huntington Mayor Brooks Fetters — “more familiar faces treating friends and family in Huntington, Indiana.”