Local biker wins third national championship

Cross country motorcycle racer Pat Flynn, of Huntington, poses with awards signifying his status as national champion of the Bike class in the Silver Masters A division of the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series at the season-ending GNCC Night of Champions banquet in Morgantown, WV, on Dec. 2.
Cross country motorcycle racer Pat Flynn, of Huntington, poses with awards signifying his status as national champion of the Bike class in the Silver Masters A division of the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series at the season-ending GNCC Night of Champions banquet in Morgantown, WV, on Dec. 2. Photo provided by Ken Hill.

Pat Flynn, a cross country motorcycle racer from Huntington, has captured his third national championship.

Flynn, 56, won the Bike class in the Silver Masters A division of the AMSOIL Grand National Cross Country Series. On Dec. 2, his achievement was recognized at the GNCC Night of Champions banquet in Morgantown, WV.

The GNCC series consisted of 13 races in eight states, held from March through October. Flynn finished the series with the distinction of having been the only racer in his class to have competed in every event. That, he says, was his goal from the start of the season. Flynn moved into a new division due to his age and observed that he would be among its youngest competitors, setting himself up nicely to contend for the title.

“I thought, well, I’m going to run the whole series and now would be my best chance,” says Flynn. “Kind of what I always wanted to do was get a national championship at the GNCC series, because it’s the biggest in the world.”

Competing on a 250 KTM XC motorcycle, Flynn took first place in two races and second in three others. He totaled 169 points on the way to claiming his division’s crown.

Ultimately, Flynn says this series was less challenging than others he’s competed in. Having participated in competitions that featured a succession of small courses on which rider bottlenecking was a common obstacle, he notes most of the GNCC courses didn’t pose that issue.

“It was less challenging because it’s so big that they would have 700 or 800 riders on the track at one time and the loops were like 12 miles long,” he observes. “Well, if it was real, real demanding, like some of the Indiana races are, it would be bottled up and you’d have hundreds of riders that aren’t as skilled as others and (blocking) the trail and it’s just a chain reaction.

“It’s kind of all rideable, so that doesn’t happen.”

For his efforts, Flynn was awarded a trophy, plus a suitcase full of new racing gear at the GNCC banquet.

With a GNCC title under his belt, Flynn says next season he’ll take a more relaxed approach to the series. Instead of venturing to all the out-of-state races, he says he’ll simply focus on the legs of the series in Indiana.

Until that time comes, he plans on enjoying his latest accomplishment in racing.

“Had a great season,” says Flynn. “Couldn’t have asked for a better season.”